Mit Winter Featured in Lead1 Association Video Podcast Discussing Newly Allowed Benefits for College Athletes

Mit Winter Featured in Lead1 Association Video Podcast Discussing Newly Allowed Benefits for College Athletes

Kennyhertz Perry attorney Mit Winter was recently featured on the LEAD1 Association’s new video podcast series, The LEAD1 Angle, discussing the new benefits and cash payments certain college athletes can now receive as a result of the Alston v. NCAA decision.  LEAD1 Association represents the athletics directors and athletics programs of the 130 member universities

Mit Winter Leads Webinar on College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Laws and College Athlete Compensation

Mit Winter Leads Webinar on College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Laws and College Athlete Compensation

Kennyhertz Perry attorney Mit Winter recently led a webinar on potential college athlete name, image, and likeness laws and college athlete compensation.  In the webinar, he covered the state-level NIL bills that have already been passed, potential federal NIL bills, potential NAIA and NCAA legislation, things universities can do to prepare for when NIL compensation

NCAA’s Division II Legislation Committee Advances Name, Image, and Likeness Proposals

NCAA’s Division II Legislation Committee Advances Name, Image, and Likeness Proposals

The Division II Legislation Committee this week recommended several legislative proposals that would permit college athletes at Division II schools to be compensated for the use of their name, image, and likeness (NIL).  The Division I Legislation Committee has not yet issued its initial proposals, but is expected to do so by September 1. The

College Athletes File New Lawsuit Against NCAA Seeking Damages Relating to Name, Image, and Likeness Restrictions

College Athletes File New Lawsuit Against NCAA Seeking Damages Relating to Name, Image, and Likeness Restrictions

A new putative antitrust class action was filed last week against the NCAA and the Power 5 conferences on behalf of two separate classes of current and former college athletes.  The lawsuit seeks damages allegedly resulting from the NCAA’s restriction on college athletes receiving compensation for the use of their names, images, and likenesses (NILs). 

Senator Marco Rubio Introducing Federal Bill That Would Require NCAA to Allow College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Compensation

Senator Marco Rubio Introducing Federal Bill That Would Require NCAA to Allow College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Compensation

Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) announced today that he will be introducing a federal bill that would require the NCAA to create bylaws that allow college athletes to be compensated for the use of their names, images, and likenesses (NILs).  The bill would also require that the NCAA allow college athletes to hire attorneys and agents

Mit Winter Featured as Expert in Article on College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Laws

Mit Winter Featured as Expert in Article on College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Laws

College sports journalist Matt Brown highlighted Mit Winter as an expert on college athlete name, image, and likeness compensation in an article for his Extra Points newsletter.  Topics covered include Florida’s new college athlete NIL law, similar laws in other states, and where things are headed with the NIL issue in the future. “Winter points

Florida Governor Signs College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Bill

Florida Governor Signs College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Bill

Governor Ron DeSantis has signed Florida’s bill that allows college athletes to be compensated by third parties for the use of their names, images, and likenesses (SB 646).  The bill was approved by both the Senate and House in March.  However, because of the coronavirus pandemic, the bill was not presented to DeSantis for approval

NCAA Board of Governors Announces Support for College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Compensation

NCAA Board of Governors Announces Support for College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Compensation

The NCAA announced today that its Board of Governors voted in support of a working group’s report and recommendations to allow NCAA college athletes to be compensated for the use of their names, images, and likenesses (“NIL”).  With this support, the three NCAA divisions will now move forward with drafting revised NIL legislative proposals for

Florida and Colorado Pass College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Bills; NCAA Says its Timeline for Proposing Changes to its Bylaws is Still on Track

Florida and Colorado Pass College Athlete Name, Image, and Likeness Bills; NCAA Says its Timeline for Proposing Changes to its Bylaws is Still on Track

Although the coronavirus has forced state legislatures to focus on bigger issues, bills in Colorado and Florida that will allows college athletes in those states to profit from their names, images, and likenesses (NILs) continued to move forward. In Colorado, the governor signed that state’s NIL bill into law on March 20, 2020.  The state

Mit Winter’s Analysis of NAIA Proposal to Allow College Athletes to be Paid for Endorsement Deals is Discussed in Athletic Business Article

Mit Winter’s Analysis of NAIA Proposal to Allow College Athletes to be Paid for Endorsement Deals is Discussed in Athletic Business Article

An Athletic Business article quotes highlights from Mit Winter’s blog post on the NAIA’s recent proposal to allow NAIA college athletes to be paid for the use of their name, image and likeness (NIL). “Kennyhertz Perry suggests that the NAIA proposal goes further — by allowing NAIA athletes to be paid for the use of

NAIA Proposes Amendments to  its Bylaws That Will Allow College Athletes to Be Paid for Endorsing Products and Making Appearances

NAIA Proposes Amendments to its Bylaws That Will Allow College Athletes to Be Paid for Endorsing Products and Making Appearances

While the NCAA moves slowly toward proposing bylaws that would allow college athletes to be compensated for the use of their names, images, and likenesses (“NILs”), another major college athletics governing body, the NAIA, has already released a proposal of its own.  And not only has the NAIA moved faster than the NCAA, its proposal